Real Lawyers Have Blogs

By Kevin O'Keefe

Latest from Real Lawyers Have Blogs

Inspired by Carolyn Elefant’s webinar this afternoon on the use of ChatGPT in the marketing of your legal practice through writing an Ebook, I started playing with ChatGPT a little bit more on the legal blogging front.

Specifically, I asked ChatGPT about the ethics of lawyers hiring ghostwriters to write blog posts and then holding out the content the public

The single biggest impediment to blog success for lawyers is failing to focus on a niche.

The tighter the niche the better.

Niche blogs become must reads for an audience, enable a lawyer to build a reputation (often where no other lawyer is playing) and enable relationships to flourish, often for work outside the niche.

I have been playing with

Why are legal bloggers uniquely equipped to serve as speakers, book authors, and journalists for stories?

If you’re a legal blogger, please share with me how blogging has opened doors to speaking, writing magazine articles or even writing a book.

I am speaking in New Orleans later this week to the Association for Continuing Legal Education (ACLEA) and I’d like

The Wall Street Journal’s Cade Metz and Karen Weise reported Monday morning that Microsoft is making a ten billion dollar investment in OpenAI, substantially increasing the company’s investment it had already made in the AI driven chatbot, ChatGPT.

Microsoft is making this investment as it looks to expand the use of artificial intelligence in all of its products.

In addition

Seventeen years ago, as the CEO of Microsoft, Bill Gates made the case for blogging.

Blogging makes it very easy to communicate. It gets away from drawbacks of email and the drawbacks of a website. Eventually, most businesses will use blogs to communicate with customers, suppliers and employees, because it’s two-way and more satisfying.

Yesterday, Microsoft CEO, Satya Nadella told